Posts Tagged ‘Slalom’

Jackson Gerard: My Favorite Thing About Barefooting

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

My favorite thing about barefooting is that I am always learning something new at World Barefoot Center. My goal this year is to start learning turns on shoe skis. I have watched David Small do turns at 45 mph and watching him makes my mind think that I want to become a world champion like him.

The funnest things I have learned to do are back toe holds, backwards start and backwards slalom. My favorite trick is backward toe holds. I am still working hard almost everyday on line step position and tumble turns.

I can’t wait to learn how to slalom like my coach Keith St Onge. He is the best in the world. He makes it look so easy but really it is hard. But the best thing about Keith is that he is easy to talk to and he is a great coach.

I have a lot of goals this year and I know I can reach them because I have the greatest coaches in the world.

By Jackson Gerard, 11
Lake Wales, FL

Jerry Kanawyer: Thank You, Swampy

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

Displaying Jerry Kanawyer Aug 2010 (49 of 55).jpg

I will be traveling to Australia three weeks early, prior to the 2014 Barefoot Waterski World Championships. I will be training with Ken Derry,  hoping that some of his slalom skills will rub off on me lol. I met Ken back in 1990 when he trained behind my 1989 Barefoot Nautique, in preparation of the 1990 World championships.

I’m coming off my best year in slalom. I posted a personal best score of 16.6, which put me 2nd in the nation with only the legend Keith St.Onge having a better score. To my surprise the elite team needed a slalom score for the world championships. The event that rarely is ever needed.

As I reflect back two years ago, I remember Swampy telling me to concentrate more on slalom and less on jump.  Swampy, I took your comments to heart and it paid off. I’m going to say it… Yes, Swampy, you were right. Thank you for being a part of making a goal that I set out to achieve 25 years ago.

Jerry Kanawyer (Flipper)

Filippo Ribaldone: Brielle Open Barefoot Competition

Tuesday, November 19th, 2013

During the second weekend of august I had the opportunity to go in Holland in Brielle to ski in another great competition and see all my good friends from all around Europe. I met Evert Aartsen, Jr.  at the airport of Amsterdam and together we been to Rob Mollencamp’s house to spend the night before going at the site.

On the second day, we met all the other skiers, Stefan Wimmer,  Kennet Eissler, Lavinia Eissler, and Lukas Eissler. I was so happy to spend some days with them.
The lake in Brielle is so good, we did the Europeans and Africans there last year, but I think 2013 was even better because we were all staying in the same hostel. It was so much fun.
Was a great competiton.  Evert did his PB in trick 5700 and everyone pushed really hard to have PB in jump…but it didn’t happen ahahaha
I think best jump was from Stefan and Evert both over 25 and then me with 24 but nobody landed 😉  The final result?  Evert first with 20.6 and me third with 19.9.
I love skiing with all this great guys from Europe…and I hope next year we will have a lot more competition like that.

Filippo Ribaldone

Chandler Cargile: Using Video Review to Improve Your Barefooting

Saturday, October 26th, 2013

There have been many things help me learn a new trick such as the coaching, the training, the encouragement, and reviewing videos. It is amazing how much it has helped me in my skiing after watching my skiing and studying it closely. The reason it helps watching video is because I can watch my own skiing and watch where I am messing up, plus I can watch it in slow motion and get into detail on where I am really going wrong. Even more than watching my own skiing, watching Keith St. Onge’s slalom and David Small’s jumping and tricks have helped me a numerous amount of times. Watching it has shown me how down weighting and being slow on the jump gives you big pop and keeping the handle out gives you more distance and time to come down on top of your feet. It has also shown me, in slalom, I am supposed to be aggressive on the transfers, shoulders forward and drive as hard as possible. And in tricks, I see how every turn is supposed to be slow and every turn is a one foot turn with a quick handle pass.

Watching my videos and going back and watching theirs has made a big help in my skiing. I recommend other skiers watch their and then watch Keith and Dave’s. It unbelievable how much it really helps.

David Small’s World Record Jump

Keith St. Onge’s video

David Small’s video

By: Chandler Cargile

The 2013 Canadian Barefoot Nationals

Monday, September 9th, 2013

The Canadian Nationals were held August 16-18 with site familiarization on the 15th. When I arrived Thurs afternoon, the wind was blowing around 30-45K (20-30 mph for the metrically challenged).  As the skiers trickled in, we were all amazed that the water was entirely skiable, in fact barely any roughness at all, so we all had the chance to practice slalom and trick runs.

Dwight Williams

The entire site was amazing. The hosts, Dwight and Michelle Williams, had a dream a few years back of having a ski lake. From start of digging (10 days) to skiing was 37 days as they created a world class venue. Becky Moynes (our new Canadian open women champion) got a hold of Dwight and Michelle in the spring of 2013 and they offered to host our Nationals. The preparation for our arrival was astonishing. Dwight even built a LARGE skier dock for the event.  As such, hands down, it is everyone’s opinion that this was the best venue and best ever event for Canadian barefoot skiing.

The boat crew change dock. A large screen TV was setup in the shade for spectators to watch the live feed.

Dwight set up bleachers in front of the jump. This location was also a great vantage point for watching the trick and slalom runs.

The Williams Family--I'm hoping they'll adopt me

The Canadian Nationals are held over 3 days: the Canadian Challenge RC (Fri), the Canadian championships (Sat) and the Canadian Open (Sun). The organizing committee went one further, make that three further, by having extended familiarization on Thursday, an extra “round” on Friday, AND allowed everyone to ski Sunday rather than just the usual top 8. Hence, Trick Jump Slalom on Fri, Sat and Sun for all who entered. On Fri, the extra round was basically familiarization for any skiers wanting extra practice and receive instruction. Steve Keating made his longline back deep, having never fully attempted this start prior to the tourney, while all the other skiers benefited from practicing  and being coached through the steps.

Travelling from afar, Lake Havasu AZ, was Gord Croteau, back for his umteenth Canadian National. Gord placed 2nd in jump, slalom and overall. There was a large contingent of Team Gordie fans (wearing team Gordie shirts) cheering him on as Gord performed somersaults in his slalom runs. We had only one American guest, Matt Michaelski who drove from Michigan and picked up Don Schwartz (2012 worlds Sr gold medalist) at Pearson Airport. Matt was back for his 2nd Canadians and participated as skier and driver. We will all be glad to see the return of our friend from Michigan.

Matt Michaelski ruining a perfectly good shot

Ruth and moi…enhancing this shot of the lake

Ruth and moi -- enhancing the shot of the lake

The weather on all 3 days of competition was perfect, hence perfect water conditions. Turn around times were minimal as the lake washed out immediately. The organization was flawless as Terry Jones, the entire Mike Spence family, Tim Weekes, Al, Barb and Becky Moynes and skier volunteers executed great driving, judging, scoring, boat changes, postings and venue adaptions.  When a slight washback was noticed from the jump on Thurs famil, Terry Jones took the initiative to turn the jump 90 degrees during trick/slalom and voila: no washback; perfect ski conditions hence only one reride, for rollback. The length of the lake was more than adequate and I can’t remember anyone running out of lake. As such many PB’s and records were posted.

Terry Jones working on the jump

Ski jump perpendicular to the lake for trick and slalom…and that might very well be my handle flying by!

The Weekes’ Sanger. Al Moynes, seen handling the rope while I slack off, judged all events hence was in the boat all day, every day. Al is a well respected Level 1 judge with three World championships experience.  George Weekes is driving, Becky is judging, Ross Holden (Mens 8 champ) is recording, and I am trying to figure out why I always miss one of two waves.

The dreaded visit with Paul Roberts on the pickup vessel. Paul is president of the OWSA – Ontario Waterski Association who travelled to Napanee and volunteered to counsel disheartened skiers. Here Ross Holden is in session with the Pres.

Enroute to a visit with Paul

One intangible that sets the tone for Canadian Nationals is the attitude of the skiers and officials toward each other. Our Nationals are low stress, friendly competitions where the skiers know each other well, volunteer and go out of their way to welcome newcomers. We had three skiers competing for the first time that did very well and showed great potential; all commented that their reticence to compete in a national competition was alleviated due to the friendly attitudes of the regulars and the officials….Mission accomplished and lessons learned.

Don Schwart,z having a laugh with newcomer Mason Timmerman and his dad Rob. The Spence girls, Michelle and Melissa, having just finished their trick runs. Marcel Brunet and Morgan Allen set to walk onto the start dock for their trick runs. We used Marcels Sanger for the slalom event and 2nd jump boat. Morgan Allen is Bram Alllen’s dad…Bram took 3rd place in Open trick

Steve and Shelley Keating took a free elevator ride to watch Terry in action.

The banquet was superb with great food, short speeches, some good laughs, competition videos played in the background and awards kept short. The overall medals were awarded at the ski site where in attendance were hundreds of friends of the Williams, followed by a great band and dance, fireworks and ski video being played off the side of the workshop with hundreds taking in the barefooting spectacle. Did I mention helicopter rides in the afternoon?

George Weekes was crowned Canadian champion, winning all 3 events and Becky Moynes took her rightful place at the top. This is a very proud moment for Mike Spence, VP Barefoot skiing Ontario, and the Weekes and Moynes families whose contributions have enhanced barefoot skiing in Ontario and Canada.

The dance following the awards…you can see on the right, tourney barefoot runs projected on the workshop.

Mike Spence, Becky Moynes and George Weekes

The Moynes Family

One final note about Becky Moynes and the hosts, Michelle and Dwight Williams. What a wonderful time had by all! Becky got the ball rolling, handled all the organization, skied, worked as an official and tourney director, and won in all aspects. Dwight is living large and created a spectacle unmatched. Thanks again for making this happen.

By: Duane Godfrey

A Visit From a World Barefoot Champion

Sunday, May 12th, 2013

The Justin Bieber of the barefoot water skiing world was coming for a visit!

At least, that is what my three daughters equated it to.  Last June, I picked up Keith St. Onge from the airport for an overnight stay and a day of barefooting with close friends, Cory Spengler and Carla Hopler.  Having Keith and close friends together for training on our own turf was a great experience.  Carla was working on slalom wake crosses and I was focusing on my trick run.  Regionals were in my future and I needed some personal training.

I always enjoy going to the World Barefoot Center to train, but highly recommend having them come to you if the opportunity arises.

Corey Jones

2012 US Nationals from Mike Holts, “Holtzy”, eyes.

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

Sunday Evening August 5th, 2012

I arrived in Waco, Texas today about 12 noon. I want to get familiar with the time zone, the site, boat, equipment, and the water so that I’m most prepared to ski the 2012 National Barefoot Championships.

I stopped at the site today; the entry gate to the facility was locked. Did that stop me? I DON’T THINK SO. So I quickly developed Plan B to figured a way in; I parked the car, squeezed past the gate and walked about ½ mile and found ‘life,’ Heath Cooper my buddy who installed the 409 PCM motor in my boat two years ago, I love this guy.

Mike Holt from tumble up flyer

Heath gave me a tour of the facility, there is a water-ski cable par, multiple water ski lakes, and some special breed animals; it’s an amazing venue –  HYPERLINK “http://www.barefootskiranch.com/” \o “http://www.barefootskiranch.com/” http://www.barefootskiranch.com/.

The facility has two ski lakes; Lake 1 is long and wide; the good part is that the length gives the skier lots of set up time, but bad part is that when the wind pick up, the lake can get choppy. Lake 2 is shorter and narrow; the bad news is that the short length requires a quick ‘set up’ which places pressure on the skiers to rush. Short set up can cause a skier to loose concentration, often without positive results. The good news is that the water should be less choppy in Lake 2.

After the tour, I see my former ski partner David Small, the current three-time World Champion. We hang out for an hour or so; it was very enjoyable and we plan to ski in the morning. This is why I arrived early; find someone to give me some pulls behind the boat on the water I’ll be competing, but to have the current World Champion be my driver/coach was beyond what I was praying for. David and I planned on dinner later tonight and maybe some ‘night barefooting.’

David Small jumping

I get to my room, the air is cool, and I’m excited to just chill out for the evening. THEN I realize that I’m to meet David for dinner at 8 pm and ‘night barefooting.’ I’m thinking … I don’t think those are good ideas now that I’m in my room.

Problem solved, I text David and blow him off; I’m at peace with my decision because I want to be ready for some serious practice in the morning. A few hours later I get a call from another ski buddy and he wants me to go to the site to do some skiing, but again I’m comfortable just relaxing tonight, so I blow him off.

Monday August 6th, 2012

I stopped by the site today to ski with David Small, I have a knot in my stomach and I’m stressed out; my big concerns in skiing at a different venue behind a different boat include:

How is the ‘table’ behind the boat?

What is the top speed can I expect?

How fast does the boat get me ‘out of the hole’?

Overall how do I feel?

What does the water feel like?

The answers were all very positive.

The wake is ‘no worries’.

I need 46.5 mph in slalom and the boat is fine.

The pull out of the ‘hole’ was soft and I need to adjust my call.

The water is interesting, the temperature is hotter and the water feels ‘soft.’ Not sure what to do, maybe I should ‘up’ my speed.

It was just David and I and felt like old times, I feel better now after practice, handle at the end of all runs.

Tuesday August 7th, 2012

Stopped by the site today and skied with Keith St Onge (KSO) who is a two-time World Champion and No. 1 rated skier in the world with his wife Lauren St Onge (she’s so sweet). I’m not relaxed because it’s hard to ski with a World Champion and be relaxed, but I do feel better knowing the venue, what to expect from the boat, and the water.

WHAT do you mean we are not skiing today behind the boat I skied behind yesterday! Great, skiing with KSO and now I have to start all over again ‘testing.’ KSO skies amazing (I feel so small). I’m very pleased with this boat, except the boat doesn’t get 46.5 mph; it’s a max of 45… not good. The water feels soft and I’m confused, do I call for more speed than normal, or stick with my standard call… big question.

I’m judging for the first time at these Nationals, so I spend 4 hours reviewing videos of skiers so that I can be prepared for the next day assignments.

Wednesday July 8th 2012

I wake up early to do more video review, have a great breakfast and go to the site to ‘hang’ with my barefooting ‘tribe members; We ‘get it,’ we understand the years of commitment to excellence, the sacrifices required, overcoming injuries, pain, disappointments along the way, we all want to do out best, but sometimes we show our worst. Competitive barefooting can be a terrible ‘head game….’

A few hours pass and I’m in boat to judge; I’m satisfied with my performance, I’m prepared. After an hour break I go into the next ‘boat crew’ to judge Open Pro Men in Tricks. My first day at Nationals I’m judging the best skiers in the planet that do so many complicated tricks in such a short time? I visit with an official and explain that this is my first time judging at National; did they ‘really’ want me in the boat? They said you’ll be okay “Holtzy”, we have video backup if needed.

I’m in the boat, skiers ski in a ‘seeded’ order where the lowest ranked skier is first and the top rank skier (KSO) is last; this allows me to warm up my skills. All of my preparation in video judging the past two years and judging elite skiers in our Southern Regional tournaments prepared me well. I did a good job in the boat and out of 32 pulls we (not just me) had to do ‘video review’ of 5 runs.

What I learned in judging the best in the world is that out of the 16 skiers there was only a handful that didn’t fall. These skiers are doing the most difficult tricks in the world and one slight mistake is disaster.

This knowledge gives me confidence that if I fall during any of my runs, its okay, it’s just that it wasn’t my day. Failure on any given day or moment doesn’t define who I am. I’m proud of my dedication, focus, commitment to excellent, and to do the best I can.

Thursday Morning, August 10, 2012

This afternoon I ski in Open Pro Men Slalom; I ski with all of the ‘top dogs’. I think my head is screw on straight, we’ll see in a few hours…

Oh yea, the boat to be used for Open Pro Men Slalom IS NOT one of the two boats I ‘tested’ Monday or Tuesday… great, another thing for the head to screw with. What speed do I call? Can I make my back-deep-to-one start on the first pass?

Thursday Afternoon, August 10, 2012

I skied today for the first time in Open Pro Men Slalom and it occurs at the 2012 National Championships. Just a little history, there are three ‘classes’ of competitors, age group, Open, and Open Pro. All skiers automatically qualify to ski in their age group against their peers. The goal of all advance barefooters to one day ski ‘Open.’ When I was younger, 30 years ago, I dreamed of one day skiing Open, but as life took its actions on my life (family/kids) I gave up that dream over 20 years ago.

However, I continued to ski with the best skiers in the world like David Small, Mike Salber, KSO, Rich Powel, Lane Bowers, Mike Seipel, Steve Merritt, Zenon Bilas, and others. After 24 years of skiing, I went Open in 2008; the cool part was that I did it at the National Championships before all the top skiers in the USA; and I won my 5th National Championship in the Men 5 division, and won the Male Barefoot Athlete of the Year.

Last year I ‘toyed’ with the idea that if I trained hard and smart enough, maybe I could qualify to ski in the “elite” division at the 2012 World Championships. To ski “elite” I had to get a qualifying score that matched the top 20th place skier in the WORLD. That score was 15.6. Up to this point, my best slalom run was 15.2 scored at the 2011 Southern Regional Championships at the age of 56 years young! For me to qualify to ski ‘elite slalom’ at the worlds with a score of 15.6 is almost impossible, but set this as my goal last year.

In July 2012, a month ago, I skied 15.8 in slalom as judged by Richard Gray the Chairman of the World Barefoot Council. With this score I not only ski in the ‘Seniors’ division at the 2012 World Championships, I’ll be skiing with David Small, Keith St Onge, Peter Fleck and other elite skiers at the age of 61!

I’m stunned that I slalom 15.8, but the biggest shocker comes the next day; I skied a 16.2 which qualified m3 to ski Open Pro at the 2012 National Barefoot Championships.

So now at the age of 61, I’m at the starting dock… I’ve eaten properly, gotten rest, drank liquids, trained as hard as I could with the best in the world, worked out to get a strong core, had massage therapy and visited chiropractor when needed, keep my focus, I’ve done EVERYTHING I can think of to be totally prepared for this instant.

I’m in the water, my heart is racing, I clean my hands  with soap so that I can grip the handle; especially since I do a ‘back-deep-to one’ for the start. With this start everything has to be perfect, rarely have I ever missed this start in a tournament, but I have missed it before, the last time was at the 2010 World Championships in Germany, let’s not review that story. Why do such a difficult start when it’s not required in Slalom? It’s a long story and one day I’ll explain…

Okay I’m in the water, a boat judge hands me the ‘tournament handle’ and I’m shocked… the handle is like a slick broom stick and I can’t get grip. I try to rub the handle to get some grip, but it’s time to GO.

I give instructions; ‘gear’, then yell ‘okay,’ the boat lunges harder that I expected, the handle slips from my palms to my finger tips… I’m struggling to not ‘loose the handle.’ I plant my ‘one’ foot in the water, wait for speed, with five officials in the boat, I really don’t have the speed I’m accustomed to. I stay as calm, I make the start, I’m on my feet; I’ve passed the first test, I’m up and ready for slalom.

I attempt to regrip the handle from my finger tips to my palms; it’s not working, this handle is crap, I need to get going, with finger tips. I complete the first crossing one foot, then the second crossing, then after the 3rd crossing and I get pull up and take a hard fall (good thing I have a neck brace). I’m bummed out, I only got 3 points on the first pass (I should have gotten 8)…

The pickup boat gets me and takes me to the end of the course to start the second pass. I give my instructions to the boat judges; I’m just skiing forward, so no drama here (unless I fall). I call 46.5 mph (I should have called 47.5, because of soft water is soft), I complete the pass and score 7.8 points (I typically score 8.2).  My score is 10.8 point… I wanted at least 15.0, would be happy with 15.6 and ecstatic with 16.2, but its official 10.8.

I don’t remember much about the rest of the day, I’m numb. What did I do wrong? In reflecting back, it

was my fault; in practice a few days ago they didn’t have the tournament handles so I used ‘my’ handle. I should have force the driver to use the ‘tournament supplied handle’ so that I would know what to expect. If I had done that I would have know about this problem and I could have come up with a solution.

Mike Front Toe

A few skiers told me they had problems with the handle Paul Stokes (Open Pro) told me “Holtzy that’s why I were gloves, you never know the condition of the tournament supplied handle.”

I plan on getting ski gloves for the Worlds, this WILL NEVER HAPPEN AGAIN.

Friday August 11, 2012

This morning I’m sick from yesterday’s failure Open Pro Slalom; I don’t want to be here anymore, I hate barefoot tournaments, I want to go home, I want to be in the arms of my wife so that she can ‘baby me.’ The reality is that I have to ski tricks in my age division, Men’s 6 (60-64 years). There are 16 skiers in the event; the lowest seed is 250 points, 2nd seed is 1500 points, and I’m top seed at 2740 points.

After an hour and half of waiting, it’s my turn to perform; I know my wife is on the computer waiting to watch me ski. I’m suited up, I wash my hands with my soap three times, and I rub my hands on the handle to make sure I have ‘the grip.’ I’m pacing back and forth like a race horse waiting to get out of the pen on the dock.

It’s not time; I take the handle, wrap it around my back, and get ready to do a flyer off the dock. I get ready to yell ‘okay’ but the rope gets hanged up in a cleat on the dock and all systems must stop.

The rope gets reset, I wrap the rope around my back, I yell, ‘in gear,’ the boat begins to move forward in idle, the rope tightens up, I yell “okay” and the boat takes off. I take seven steps, launch myself off the dock in superman and pray I make my flying-back-tumble-deep-to-one start. This start is worth 800 points, the highest scoring start. I don’t know when the last time anybody other than myself has done this start at a National Championship.

I land on the water on my chest, ride on the stomach at 2300 rpm, then turn to the backward position, plant one foot in the water, wait for boat speed, the driver David Miller nails the throttle, I still wait for ‘speed’ and then I press the foot in the water and attempt to stand up on one foot.

I make it, the driver pulled me perfectly and I did what I needed to do; I’m stoked. I regrip the handle; pull it in and down to my butt and start the trick run – one foot, one foot reverse, surface hop – wait I don’t think the hop was high enough for credit, so I do the surface hop again, then a turn from backward to forward, then tumble-360-to-one, reverse tumble-360-to-one, tumble-180-to-one, then reverse 180-tumble-to-one. I have an almost the perfect pass, except the double surface hop. You can see the video at:  HYPERLINK “https://docs.google.com/folder/d/0B2dZybUIi_ohZnl3R21XUFhWeFU/edit?pli=1#docId=0B2dZybUIi_ohRG1hbDJ0dktidDg” https://docs.google.com/folder/d/0B2dZybUIi_ohZnl3R21XUFhWeFU/edit?pli=1#docId=0B2dZybUIi_ohRG1hbDJ0dktidDg

I’m happy with the first pass but I’m still stressed; on the second pass I do a back-deep-to-one start, this is the second most difficult start in barefooting and it’s worth 500 points. I give the boat officials my instructions, the boat tightens the rope, I give the signals ‘in gear’, then ‘okay’ and I roll over on to my stomach. The boat takes off, I wait for speed, plant one foot, press the foot into the water, and when I feel I have sufficient speed I attempt to stand up – and I make it!

Now I do a ‘positional back-to-front turn’ to set up for the first trick; I’ve missed the back-to-front turn before at a National Championship and also once at the 2012 World Championships in Germany. I’m up backward, I get into position for the turn, and attempt the back-to-front turn; I nail it, clean feet-to-feet. I place the handle over my head and do – neck-2-foot, neck-1-foot, neck-1-foot reverse, then a one-foot, one-foot reverse, teeth-2-foot, teeth-1-foot, teeth-1-foot reverse, rope-on-foot, rope-on-foot reverse, tumble-2-foot, and reverse tumbel-2-foot. I did everything and it was flawless.

I know my wife loves the ‘butt slide’ so I do a nice butt slide, look at camera, and give her a signal via the internet that ‘these two passes were for you baby.’

You can see the second video run at:  HYPERLINK “https://docs.google.com/folder/d/0B2dZybUIi_ohZnl3R21XUFhWeFU/edit?pli=1#docId=0B2dZybUIi_ohNEpWVHVHTGdhWTA” https://docs.google.com/folder/d/0B2dZybUIi_ohZnl3R21XUFhWeFU/edit?pli=1#docId=0B2dZybUIi_ohNEpWVHVHTGdhWTA

Immediately after the trick event I call my wife and tell her ‘I love barefoot waterskiing, I love barefoot tournaments, and I’m so glad I’m here!’

The emotions in competitive barefoot skiing at a National Championships can be overwhelming. This week I had some success and some failures, and lessons learned. I didn’t achieve my goal of skiing at least 15.0 in Open Pro so that I could ski in the Open Pro finals, but I know I did the best I could.

National Record – Later I find out my score was 2700 points, the current record for Men 6 is 1310 points. After record review the runs are reduced to 2650 points; I have the current record in Men 5 and now I have the Men 6 trick record. It might be a long time before anybody breaks the Mens 6 trick record.

National Champion – My terrible slalom pass of 10.8 exceeds the 7.28 of the highest Men 6 skier, so I get 1000 points in the Slalom event for overall; my 2700 points in tricks gives me 1000 points in the tricks event. This results in an over all score of 2000 out of 2000 points; I win the 2012 Overall National Men 6 Champion and I think this is my eighth Overall National Championship win.

My season is not done, I have the World Barefoot Championships in two weeks to complete my season; I have my goals set, we’ll review them in a few weeks.

Holtzy

P.S. Joe Malenfant, the President of the American Barefoot Club (ABC) that the record set today was not accurate and that the actual record was base don my performance at the 2012 Regionals tricks event of 2740 points, which was downgraded to 2720 points!

By : Mike Holt

David Small Barefoot Clinic in Washington State with Big A and his goats :)

Sunday, July 24th, 2011

Adin Danneker put this clinic on on his private lake in Olympia, Washington.

Adins perfect water ski lake


On Adins lake there are two decent sized turn islands which were getting a little over grown so on one of the days where it was a little windy we took some time out, took an hour drive and bought a couple of goats. The kids at the lake named them Jerry and Dude.

The transportation of the goats to the turn island on the lake


Once back to the house we transported them across to the islands where they proceeded to eat non-stop and get visits everyday from the kids that live on the lake.
Adin built his house and has an amazing set up with his boat slip leading straight from his garage to the lake and the boats already set up and hooked up to his tractor in the garage so its as easy as opening a door and backing it in!! Also in the garage is a big flat screen and a Audi R8 to take out on the few days a year there its not raining in Washington 😉

Adins toy for when its dry out :)

We had a tournament the weekend after the clinic so Adin and I were working on trick runs and trying to clean up slalom so as not to get cut. Adins multiple turns at the end of the week were great and he skied up a storm in the comp with a high 5000 point trick run, nearly equaling his PB in slalom and landing most of his inverted jumps!!
Jerry Kanawyer came to the clinic and we continued on from what we were working on while I was at Jerries place. He got better and better at his surface turns as well as figuring out some new slalom techniques. We jumped a bit while at Adins and Jerry is getting a good inversion on a 10 foot line which is very similar to a long line jump.

Jerry Kanawyer getting ready for battle ;)


The best way to learn the inverted style is directly on a Barefoot International boom (lifted very high) until the technique is perfected and there is no fear in the skier coming in to the ramp. If it doesn’t go as planned go to the WBC shoe skis and start on these. Then a it is best to have a slow progression from the boom by going on just the V of the handle. After this you just inch the line out until on a 10 or 15 foot line off the boom.
Jerry also skied great at the tournament in all 3 events, and did great which was nice to see.
Doug Jorden also came over and did a lot of Barefoot jumping as he is also learning the new inverted jump technique. Doug jumps a good distance on the long line but in a traditional style and when trying to invert long line he has a small mental block and pushes the handle down. What was done to try to overcome this was to keep him on the boom but extend the line further and further out until he was jumping on a 45 foot line! Impressive!

Doug on a 45 foot line on the WBC shoe skis invert jumping.... nearly on the long line!!!


I was there for 4th of July where we went to Lake Silverado in Adna for some skiing and fireworks which was better than anything public we could have traveled to!!!

Had to get a patio heater going as the sun set on Lake Silverado while we waited for the fireworks for the 4th of July celebrations.


Val Shinn came and had a day in sunny Washington where she worked her backwards position as well as sorting out her slalom. Judy Myers who is 68 came and skied with us for a few days. Even after a recent injury and a couple of months out came back and was working on her front one foots and her backwards position as well get getting her edging out of the wake sorted on the long line.

John Macdonald, Judy Myers, Claudia and Dave Landon and myself (David Small)


Claudia and Dave Landon came with 82 year old John Macdonald for a day. Claudia worked on her front one foot and toe hold position as well as getting her first backwards one foot on her feet (which Dave was jealous of). Dave was also working on his front position as well as his backwards one foots which looked good on the WBC shoe skies but he was a little slower than Claudia on transferring it to his feet.

Dave Landon sporting the head zone helmet


Im sure Claudia did he one foot at the end of the day so that Dave didn’t have a chance to get back out there to try to equal her… great marriage rivalry. John Macdonald is going strong and at 82 years young is an amazing skier!! He skies no problem skiing on the boom or long line and was working on butt riding out of the wake so he could stand in calmer water.

82 year old John Macdonald doing his flyer at Lake Silverados competition


With the help of the head zone (turned all the way up..lol) he figured out how to get out of the wake and nearly did a full wake crossing which would give him a US record for his age division!! GOOOOO JOHN!!

82 year old John, myself (David Small) and 68 year old Judy Myers on the start dock

Jay Leuek had a day skiing with us where he learned his back toe holds and step position as well as sorting out his front position… he found that byb not plowing it made his life a lot easier to progress.

Jerry Kannesky doing some dry land practice


Jerry Kannesky came over for a day and a half and its great to have him around. He is extremely passionate about barefooting and brings a lot of energy to the boat! In just a day Jerry got his back to fronts feet to feet on the long line, all 4 turns on the boom on his feet in one pass and the step ones and hop on the boom!! He hadn’t jumped much before and got out there on the boom and in a couple of jumps was doing some great inverted jumps and landing pretty much feet to feet. Amazing!

Jay showing us great form on a back toe hold on the WBC shoe skis


Cheers Adin for having me back out to your pad dude!! I always have a great time over there and Ill be looking forward to seeing you over at Nationals!!

Adins dog, Maggie is finding it hard to see so she borrows Adins glasses from time to time.

1st Barefoot Clinic Stop in South Carolina

Sunday, June 5th, 2011

The trip started of with an interesting leg as Charlie (my toy poodle) came with me and it was his first flight.  Fortunately he is a great traveler and did not make a peep the whole way so we were clear sailing.

Ron Meeks, the clinic organizer, met me at the airport and took me to his place on the lake.  This is probably the most organized clinic I have ever been to as when I arrived Ron had a spread sheet there with the whole week planned out with who is coming, what we are having for lunch and dinner for the week and anything else you could imagine.

The first day started off with this water and pretty much continued throughout the week! …

There were a few days where we had some chilly weather which made it a little more difficult to get motivated to get in the water and learn something new.

Then there were also days where a lot of sun cream was needed 😉

One of the skiers, Shawn, has a plane not to far away so on one of the evenings we took a little trip to see the local area and to get an arial view of the set up we were using…  Cheers Shawn!!

I had a great week there and all the skiers learned so much including Ron Meeks doing some surface turns on his feet for the first time and sorting his back wakes, Becky learning her toe holds and getting better at backwards, Jim Miller learning backwards long line, Mark rocking turns out as well as some great slalom and much much more but it would take too long for me to mention.

Everyone skied a lot and resorted to taking small naps in-between sets :)

O, there were also these bugs that only came out ever 13 years, mated and then died within a couple of weeks (kinda cool) and we also came across a snake trying to eat birds under a bridge….

Getting started with Barefoot Competitions

Saturday, March 26th, 2011

How do I start competing in Barefoot Water Skiing tournaments?

To start competing in Bare foot Water-Skiing tournaments is simple enough. All you have to do is sign up to the AWSA (American Water-ski Association), find where the nearest barefooting competition is near you this summer, and fill out an application online at http://www.barefoot-forum.com/entryform/entryform.aspx and you are good to go!!

How do I sign up?

To sign up and join the AWSA (American Water-ski Association) is simple enough, simply go to http://www.usawaterski.org/pages/Join.html and select the online sign-up option, then follow the instructions and you’re there!

Where are the Barefoot Water Skiing tournaments?

Barefoot waterskiing tournaments are all over America, and can be broken down and located in 5 “Regions”: The Midwest, The West, The East, The South Central, and The South. Each of these regions hold their own regional tournaments, as well as smaller tournaments within each of their regions. For more information on up and coming tournaments near you, visit the (AWSA) American Barefoot Water-ski Club website, or click on the link below.

http://www.barefoot.org/

What is a trick run?

A trick run is a combination of two passes, where the objective is to do as many tricks as you can in 15 seconds. Each trick is given a certain amount of points, with more points being awarded for more difficult tricks. You also are given points on the start method you do at the start of each pass, with more points being given for a harder start. Click on the link below to see the 2011 Rule book, with scores for each trick on the last pages

http://www.worldbarefootcouncil.com/docs/2011_WBC_Rule_Book_Condensed.pdf

Or, to view some world record trick runs from the last few years by World Champions Keith St. Onge and David Small, check out the link below. http://www.WorldBarefootCouncil.com/records.php

How does the slalom event work?

The slalom event works the same as the trick event, where you have two passes each with 15 seconds. This time however, instead of doing as many tricks as you can you must cross the wake, back and forth (Similar to slalom skiing on a ski), as many times as you can on 1 foot in 15 seconds. You have one pass to ski forwards, and one pass to ski backwards. If your foot lifted touches the water, you are only given a 0.5 point value for that crossing.

How good do I have to be to Barefoot Water ski?

If you can stand on two feet, and have fun doing it, then you’re good enough! Anyone can Barefoot Water-ski and you don’t have to be a particular age to learn either-WBC Staff member and skier Judy Myers is 68 years young and still going strong to this day!!

Where can I find a bare foot suit?

These days, barefoot waterskiing wet suits are generally quite easy to come by, there are a lot of stores online you can order from, including Lake Elmo Sports, who has been a strong and reliable dealer for all things skiing for years now! Check them out at online for a wet-suit today at http://www.lakeelmosports.com/home.php or take a look our range of equipment on our online pro shop today at www.worldbarefootcenter.com for the World ‘s best barefoot wetsuits – worn and skied in by the World Champions from the last 10 years!!