Posts Tagged ‘off water’

Sam Meredith: The FITT Principle

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013
As with many sports sometimes the best way to maintain ski fitness is putting in the hard hours on the water, however I am a firm believer having a fitness programme off the water is essential in maximizing your success.
It’s easy to understand why some people feel overwhelmed about beginning a new fitness routine. With so much information (and misinformation), it can be hard to decipher what fitness regimen will really deliver results. But truthfully, it’s not difficult at all to determine the basic theory that should underpin every fitness programme.
An easy way to get started is utilizing the F.I.T.T. principle. This acronym stands for Frequency, Intensity, Time and Type.
Frequency: As you might expect, this refers to how often you will exercise. After any form of exercise is performed your body completes a process of rebuilding and repairing. So, determining the frequency of exercise is important in order to find a balance that provides just enough stress for the body to adapt and also allows enough rest time for healing. I would suggest if your not sking an an awful lot and would like to maintain fitness you should be undertaking skiing specific fitness exercises at least three timer per week to prevent muscular atrophy. A skier who is physically fit may exercise most days but the type of activity and level of intensity may differ to prevent overload and allow recovery.
Intensity: Defined as the amount of effort or work that must be invested in a specific exerciseworkout. This too requires a good balance to ensure that the intensity is hard enough to overload the body but not so difficult that it results in overtraining, injury or burnout. I would suggest you train at high intensity with regular rest intervals to try and simiulate a set of ski passes.
Time: Again, this is rather self-explanatory. Time is simply how long each individual session should last. This will vary based on the intensity and type and your current level of fitness.

Type: What type of exercise will you be doing? Will an exercise session be primarily cardiovascular, resistance training or a combination of both? And, what specific exercises will you perform. To train properly off the water you will need to target all areas of fitness. These areas can easily be split in to
separate sessions and performed on different days during the week.

By:  Sam Meredith

Reduce Barefooting Injuries with Strength Training

Monday, May 6th, 2013

In every sport, athletes prepare their bodies to accomplish whatever sport they want to participate in. Barefoot skiing is no exception!

Barefooting puts huge external forces on muscles and joints. Crashes twist and turn our bodies in abnormal ways. This sport requires all shoulder, arm , core  and  leg muscles to be strong. To reduce injury and have the muscles protect the joints, it is important to strength train these areas. Just a few minutes a day, 2x a week will create muscle balance and strength.

We all lead busy lives, but this can simply be done while watching TV– all you need are some weights. Keep a set nearby and use them often.  By strengthening your body off the water, you will be better prepared for whatever happens on the water.

~Carol Jackson

Off season, off the water training… Get in better ski shape!!!

Thursday, March 8th, 2012

If you are serious about barefoot water skiing or any other sport that is relatively seasonal then you will need to think about what you are going to be doing in the ‘off season’. Unless you live in Florida or some tropical climate then it will be hard to train on the water when the lakes are frozen or it is bitterly cold and raining all the time……… I.E. England 😉
You don’t need to be a member of a gym and have to drive miles to get some basic work out in. Barefoot water skiing is a lot of core work and balance so working this out will make a big difference when you come to start skiing again.
Some basic things you can buy for your home are a chin up bar, swiss ball (big blow up ball), bosu ball circular top with half a blow up ball underneath and some basic weights. Using these simple things you can get a decent work out at home and can stow all of this stuff in a corner somewhere out of the way so that the wife doesn’t moan at you.
Here are a few simple exercises that you can try at home…

Stand upright on the Bosu ball holding some weights by your side. Try to keep your feet as flat as possible and your back as straight as you can and slowly squat down.

Position at the top of a squat

Bottom of the squat

Drop the weights and stand on one leg, lift the leg in the air in front of you (like a toe hold) and then keeping your core tight and foot flat slowly move in to a back toe hold position. Keep doing this until your standing leg is fatigued (you will start shaking).

One leg balance

Continuing the one leg balance exercise


Another balance exercise is to, again standing on one leg, reach your leg in the air off to the side and arms up in the air. Once stable, reach the leg across and behind your body and brings your arms in the opposite direction. It is important to keep your stomach muscles tight and engaged to get the full benefits from this exercise.

Balance

Balance

The last couple of exercises on the bosu ball are using some dum bells. Engage your core, have a slight bend in your knees and complete slow bicep curls, shoulder press’s, side and front arm lifts to work your shoulders.

Biceps on the bosu

Shoulder press on Bosu

Shoulder press on Bosu

Setting up for front arm lifts

Front arm lift

Setting up for side lifts on bosu ball

Side arm lifts on Bosu

Setting up a chin up bar in your house is easy and is a good way of working your shoulders, biceps, and back….. all good for footing. You can do chip ups with your palms facing back, forward, arms narrow and arms wide. This will work slight different muscle groups and then you can lift your legs up in front of your hips for an abb workout at the same time.

Setting up for a chin up

Top of chin up

For abdominal exercises you can sit on the swiss ball with your legs together and do some front and side crunches. This will work your middle and upper abs. To work your lower abs you can lay in your push up position with your feet on the ball and roll your legs to your chest and butt up in the air. You can also sit on an upturned boss ball, sit slightly back with your legs outstretched and then bring your legs in to your chest.

Straight abb crunch. Upper and middle abbs.

Straight abb crunch. Upper and middle abbs.

Set up for lower abbs

lower abbs

Lower abbs on Bosu

Lower abbs on Bosu

Side to side abbs on Bosu

All of these exercises will give you a little head start in to the on season but you need to be engaging your core muscles and concentrating on good technique.

Enjoy!!

Written by David Small

Small’z