Posts Tagged ‘barefooter’

Sam Meredith – YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT! EAT TO SKI FITNESS

Thursday, October 29th, 2015

vegetables

Eating a healthy, balanced diet is an important part of maintaining good health, and can help you feel your best. It doesn’t have to be difficult either. Eat the right amount of calories for how active you are, so that you balance the energy you consume with the energy you use. If you eat or drink too much, you’ll put on weight. If you eat and drink too little, you’ll lose weight. It is recommended that men have around 2,500 calories a day (10,500 kilojoules). Women should have around 2,000 calories a day (8,400 kilojoules). Most adults are eating more calories than they need, and should eat fewer calories.  Eat a wide range of foods to ensure that you’re getting a balanced diet and that your body is receiving all the nutrients it needs.

 

Starchy foods should make up around one third of the foods you eat, potatoes, cereals, pasta, rice and bread. Most of us should eat more starchy foods: try to include at least one starchy food with each main meal. Some people think starchy foods are fattening, but gram for gram the carbohydrate they contain provides fewer than half the calories of fat.

It’s recommended that we eat at least five portions of fruit and veg. It’s easier than it sounds. A glass of unsweetened 100% fruit juice (150ml) can count as one portion, and vegetables cooked into dishes also count. I try to mount my plate with lean meat and fill up on green vegetables not too many root vegetables if you want to lean up.

 

Fish is a good source of protein and contains many vitamins and minerals. Aim to eat at least 2 portions of fish a week, including at least one portion of oily fish. Oily fish contains omega-3 fats, which may help to prevent heart disease. You can choose from fresh, frozen and canned: but remember that canned and smoked fish can be high in salt. Oily fish include salmon, mackerel, trout, herring, fresh tuna, sardines and pilchards. Non-oily fish include haddock, plaice, coley, cod, tinned tuna, skate and hake. If you regularly eat a lot of fish, try to choose as wide a variety as possible. We all need some fat in our diet. But it’s important to pay attention to the amount and type of fat we’re eating. There are two main types of fat: saturated and unsaturated. Too much saturated fat can increase the amount of cholesterol in the blood, which increases your risk of developing heart disease. Saturated fat is found in many foods, such as hard cheese, cakes, biscuits, sausages, cream, butter, lard and pies. Try to cut down on your saturated fat intake, and choose foods that contain unsaturated fats instead, such as vegetable oils, oily fish and avocados. For a healthier choice, use just a small amount of vegetable oil or reduced-fat spread instead of butter, lard or ghee. When you’re having meat, choose lean cuts and cut off any visible fat.

fresh salmon steak on white background

Sugary foods and drinks, including alcoholic drinks, are often high in energy (measured in kilojoules or calories), and if eaten too often, can contribute to weight gain. They can also cause tooth decay, especially if eaten between meals. Cut down on sugary fizzy drinks, alcoholic drinks, sugary breakfast cereals, cakes, biscuits and pastries, which contain added sugars: this is the kind of sugar we should be cutting down on, rather than sugars that are found in things such as fruit and milk.

 

Food labels can help: use them to check how much sugar foods contain. More than 22.5g of total sugars per 100g means that the food is high in sugar, while 5g of total sugars or less per 100g means that the food is low in sugar. Use food labels to help you cut down. More than 1.5g of salt per 100g means the food is high in salt. Adults and children over 11 should eat no more than 6g of salt a day. Younger children should have even less. Eat less salt, eating excessive amounts of salt has been proven to increase the risk of heart disease.

 

Eating a healthy, balanced diet plays an essential role in maintaining a healthy weight, which is an important part of overall good health. Being overweight or obese can lead to health conditions such as type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, heart disease and stroke.  Most adults need to lose, and need to eat fewer calories to do this. If you’re trying to lose weight, aim to eat less and be more active. Eating a healthy, balanced diet will help: aim to cut down on foods that are high in fat and sugar, and eat plenty of fruit and vegetables. Don’t forget that alcohol is also high in calories, so cutting down can help you to control your weight.

 

Physical activity can help you to maintain weight loss or be a healthy weight. Being active doesn’t have to mean hours at the gym: you can find ways to fit more activity into your daily life. For example, try getting off the bus one stop early on the way home from work, and walking. Being physically active may help reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes.  After getting active, remember not to reward yourself with a treat that is high in energy. If you feel hungry after activity, choose foods or drinks that are lower in calories, but still filling.

 

We need to drink about 2 litres to stop us getting dehydrated. This is in addition to the fluid we get from the food we eat. All non-alcoholic drinks count, but water and lower-fat milk are healthier choices. Try to avoid sugary soft and fizzy drinks that are high in added sugars and calories, and are also bad for teeth. Even unsweetened fruit juice is sugary, so try to limit how much you drink to no more than one glass (about 150ml) of fruit juice each day.

 

Some people skip breakfast because they think it will help them lose weight. In fact, research shows that eating breakfast can help people control their weight. A healthy breakfast is an important part of a balanced diet, and provides some of the vitamins and minerals we need for good health. A whole grain cereal with fruit sliced over the top is a tasty and nutritious breakfast. Eating healthy makes you feel a lot better in yourself and can make you train harder and give you increased mental focus which is a key factor for barefoot skiing.

 

– Sam Meredith

Brice Storman – The First Time

Friday, April 10th, 2015

My first day at WBC was pretty awkward. I knew I was around the best barefooters you could meet and I didn’t want to make a fool out of myself.  We go out on the boat and I’m the last one to ski. When I’m up to ski my heart starts racing as I plop in the water. Ben Groen, my instructor for the time spent over at WBC, is one of the coolest and nicest people you could meet. He put me out on the seahorse first, which I thought was for sissies; I thanked him in my head for taking me off. Then the thanking reversed. The boom was so hard but I didn’t complain. I took so many falls it felt like forever but it really wasn’t. Fall after fall, my confidence depletes. The third day Ben has the idea of putting me back on the seahorse and I feel so embarrassed. But it works: first try, I stood up on the boom. A couple tries later, I’m on the short line and it’s awesome.

Thank goodness Ben never gave up on me and I never gave up on him!

unnamed

Brice Storman – Summer 2013

Monday, March 30th, 2015

2I had just learned how to slalom ski and I thought it was the time of my life, just weaving back and forth through the water. Amazing, I thought. As summer neared its end, my dad told me about this insane water sport called BAREFOOTING. At first that sounded like some lame sport that nobody’s ever heard of. Then my dad showed me a video of it and it was the coolest thing ever. My dad asked me if I wanted to try it next summer and I said yes as enthusiastic as my worried mind would let me.

A year passed and the barefooting thing had slipped from my mind but it hadn’t slipped from my dad’s. He reminded me mid-summer and I tried to make the excuse that we didn’t have anywhere to go to barefoot. But he already found a place to go. He said WBC. So we went and checked it out. 6 or 7 months later, I’m now a sponsored skier and skiing every weekend, having the time of my life with some of the coolest people you could meet.

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Ben Groen – Featured in the Australian Waterski Magazine

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

Ben Groen made the cover of the July/August 2013 Australian Waterski Magazine and he was also featured inside with a 6 page article. This article is a must read! It gives you a little insight into the World Barefoot Center, some of his biggest achievements and what he is aspiring to achieve in the future. (Click on each individual page to read).  To see more magazines Ben has been featured in, go to our website and click on the Pros Page.

How to Barefoot Backwards (Back Deep Water Start)

Saturday, February 4th, 2012

Glen Plake, Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame

Hook Ankle Under Rope

So you’re ready to start learning how to barefoot backwards?   Before you start, here a quick few pointers that will make things go a little smoother and keep the “nasal water logging” to a minimum. (And there’s always nose tape for that!)

To get up backwards we are going to stick to three simple steps:

-Planing on your belly and riding the plant.

-Transitioning from the plant to backwards barefooting position.

-Position while skiing backwards.

1.  PLANING ON YOUR BELLY AND RIDING THE PLANT

Roll Over Onto Belly

Float on your back, place the handle between legs and reach behind and grab it with both hands, hook one of your ankles under the rope

Time to take a deep breath and roll over, making sure you keep your body, arms, and legs straight. You will only be unable to breathe for maybe a second.  The driver should now pull you out of the water at a nice SLOW speed (too fast and you begin to porpoise and bounce). The water line should be breaking right around your knees.  10-12 mph will be your speed.

Now in this position you should easily be able to plane on your belly – making sure you are pushing your chest towards the water (this will create an air pocket and you will be able to breathe), and staying stiff like a board. This will not only allow you to breathe but it will also keep you from

Stay Stiff As A Board

bouncing and you will be in much more control. Once you are comfortable with this position, very slowly take your feet off the rope, and before being able to plant you will need to make sure you flex your feet.

This means pulling your toes back towards your ankles (it is very important not to point your toes otherwise they will go straight through). Turn outwards to a 45 degree angle and slowly place them onto the water, a little wider then hips width (an exercise to do to practice gliding on your feet would be to do one foot at a time with one foot staying hooked on the line and getting the feeling of the water coming off your feet – once you have them in the right position the water should flex the feet automatically for you, you shouldn’t push against the water or curl your toes down Once you are comfortable with one foot, put it back on the rope and repeat with the other.)

Take Feet Off Of The Rope

While doing this, the rest of your body should be fairly relaxed.  Once you are comfortable enough to plant with both feet you should be able to ride this position comfortably for 30 seconds. If you can’t do this because you are out of control, it can mean you’re not allowing the water to flex your feet, which means you will be gas pedaling (pointing toes or gripping). Remember-at no POINT should you ever pull in on your arms. You should still be remained with your chest pushed into the water.

Once you can glide with your feet on the water you are ready for the next step.

2. TRANSITIONING INTO A STANDING POSITION

Now that you can ride, on your chest, with your feet planted in the water,

Planting Feet

you will need to, what we call BREAK, which means pushing your chest and chin down while allowing your hips (butt) to push up towards the sky. This is very important factor. Imagine sticking your head between your legs so that you’re folding in half. While you break and you feel your upper body starting to lift you will need to make sure that you start to pull your legs closer so it makes it easier to stand (about shoulder width). Keep rotating your feet and knees inwards.

A key factor in the breaking point is to WAIT as long as you can and to allow the boat to do the work. AT NO POINT DURING THIS STAGE should you try to lift your upper body and/or head to try and stand. You MUST wait, wait, wait and then when you think you have waited long enough, wait some more. This is the part most people have trouble with.

Pushing Chin Down And Hips Up

Keep pushing your hips upwards as you rotate your feet inward (feet should be parallel to one another) until you feel the water on your chin. You will need to maintain bent knees and make sure you don’t come up too tall.

3. BACKWARDS BAREFOOTING POSITION

Congratulations, if you’ve made it this far, you’re now barefooting backwards!!! Now that you’re up and skiing however, you need to keep focused and make sure you are in a solid position. You want to be broken away at the hips, but still arching your back, and keeping your head up, your knees should be bent into athlete position, with your arms straight, and glued to your butt. (If the handle is away from your butt, you will be pulled out over the back much easier). If you are sliding around a lot, get off those toes and ski flat on your feet!! Using the whole surface of you

Breaking

foot (Water line should be up around your instep) will allow you to glide easily on the water, instead of sliding around or pushing water.  The driver should not exceed speeds over 28-32 mph depending on the size of the skier.   If the skier is having difficulty at this speed they do not have the correct position.  Any faster can result in a hard fall.

Driver Notes:

Boom height.

Higher booms will make it harder for the skier to slowly put their feet in the water and they might end up dumping them into the water, whereas if the boom isn’t high enough it will make it harder for the skier to get up. The boom should really sit around the skiers shoulder height when in

Backwards Position

the back barefoot position. (About 4-5 feet off the water)

Boat speeds.

– Planing stage: A nice SLOW (10-12 mph) speed-if bouncing occurs, you’re going too fast.

– Planting: Once you can see that the skier has got a firm even plant then it is time to bring the boat up to speed (this is a smooth, consistent, and gradual movement on the throttle.)

– Standing speed: This depends on the weight of the skier, but most people up to 200lbs will be able to backwards barefoot happily at no more than 32 mph.  More speed will only be applied after several miles have been occurred on their feet.  This means several sets and 20 days or more of skiing backwards.   Do not be in a hurry to do back one foots as this should be done on shoe skis first!

-Ending the pass: Unlike when your skier is going forwards, he/she can’t see when the end of the run is coming up!!! While this seems pretty straight forward, you’ll save a lot of last minute head smashers if you just ease off very gradually, letting the skier know the end is coming and giving them time to let go and lean away, instead of suddenly losing speed and going head over heels!!

–       Ashleigh Stebbeings, Australia


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WBC Head to Head Tournament!!

Tuesday, September 27th, 2011

There will be a LIVE VIDEO FEED on WORLDBAREFOOTCENTER.COM of the WBC Head-to-Head tournament being held at Lake David, Groveland, Florida on October 7th & 8th. The tournament starts at 7am eastern time on the 7th so make sure you jump on our website and check it out.

WBC Open Invitational Tournament Rules & Information

Thursday, September 8th, 2011

The WBC Open Invitational is a Head-to-Head fast paced 3-event high stakes tournament. There will be three categories of competition; Overall, Tricks, Jump, and Slalom. This tournament will have a total cash payout of $20,500. The Breakdown of this sum is as follows:

Overall

–   1st –   $5,000

–     2nd –  $2,500

–     3rd –  $1,000

Single Events

–     1st –   $2,500

–     2nd –  $1,000

–     3rd –   $500

The way that the tournament will be run is under a very different format than any tournament before it. The event will start with 2 elimination rounds of both tricks and slalom. All competitors will be included in both elimination rounds. Jumping will include only 1 elimination round, consisting of 4 jumps per skier. Each skier’s best score out of either elimination round becomes his or her seed score for the rest of the tournament. The top 8 seeded skiers in each event will move on to the head-to-head format.

After elimination, head-to-head begins. From this point on, all jump rounds will only consist of 2 jumps per skier. The seed scores determine the pairings for each round (i.e. #1 vs. #8; #2 vs. #7 etc.). The higher seeded skier of each pair will receive the option of choosing to ski before or after his or her competitor. The winners move on to the next round and the losers are immediately eliminated from that event.

Once the final 4 skiers emerge, the seed scores once again base the pairings for the second round. The winners proceed to the third and final round in a head-to-head battle for first and second place. The skier with the higher second round score of the two losers will take third place.

The Overall category winners will be determined by the skiers’ best score in each event throughout the entire tournament, including the elimination rounds.

Judging will follow the same rules as the standard 3-event competition; however, this tournament will feature Instant Scoring. Each score will be announced and recorded before the next skier is pulled.

WBC Invitational Teaser 2

Thursday, September 8th, 2011

4 weeks to go until the WBC Invitational!! Check out the latest video.

WBC INVITATIONAL OFFICIAL TEASER 2 – DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES? from WorldBarefootCenter on Vimeo.

St. Louis Figure Eight Champion Ron Blouw!

Thursday, August 11th, 2011

Glen Meuller St. Louis Figure Eight hosted by the Barefoot Gang which includes Tim Konezter and Anthony Gramilino.

Setting up the tourney and getting ready for the skiers  hit the water.

Barefooters hit the water slapping fives and grrrring through the rollers!

Ron Blouw

Ready to compete

Footers!

Game On!

Figure Eights just wouldn’t be the same without men painting there toes.  They secretly like it:) Checkout these beauties!

Aren't those pretty?

Toes!

And the skiing and camaraderie goes on…..

Hot Feet!

Good Fun

Barefooters getting ready

Figure 8

Now for the awards!

Winners of the First Eight or Shortest 8?

Chris McWaters with the BEST FALL of the tourney!

KSO and Blouw hold the tourney Records 2 1/4 figure 8

Catlynn's First Figure Eight!

In 4th Place Keith St. Onge

4th Place! Keith St. Onge

In 3rd Place JJ Link

3rd Place! JJ Link

In 2nd Place Tim Hydro Konezter

Tim Konezter in 2nd Place! Also the annoucer:)

And for the  Glen Meuller St. Louis Figure Eight Champion Ron Blouw!

Ron Blouw

Rob Blouw takes 1st Place!

Barefooters get on the podium:

Tim, Ron, JJ

Congratulations to all the skiers we hope to see you at the next tourney!  Thank you to all the organizers and competitors we appreciate your hard works and support.

By Keith St. Onge and Lauren Lindeman

Footin’ on a Piece of Heaven- St. Louis

Monday, August 8th, 2011

The wind was howling, leaves were blowing and yet and the quiver off the Mississippi River was GLASS calm all day long!  The water was a little high so we had to watch out for debris, other than that it was great skiing conditions. The day prior to the clinic the Anytime Fitness Tour Bus had some issues and needed a little bit of work done on it, so Lauren was not around to take pictures the first day:(  Here is our crew for the second day!

Mark got up for the first time backwards on shoe skis!  How sweet is that!  Then he took it one step further and easily did a backwards one foot. Great work!

Great backwards barefoot position

Back One Foot

 Mark’s son Nathan came out and did some footin’ too!  Before barefoot lessons with Keith St. Onge Nathan was tumbling up directly on the boom.  After a few goes look at Nathan go on the shortline! Way to go buddy!

Ready for a tumble up!

Nathan on the Shortline!

Kristin Smith learns a step off with ease! First on the boom then shortline and next step behind the boat on the longline.  Keep working it Kristin, we hope to see your name in the brackets on the WBC Figure Eight Championships in Winter Haven, FL.  Remember future Figure 8’ers…learn your one foots on the boom before you attempt kicking a ski!

One Foot!

Stepping OffOne Foot!

Caitlynn Smith is a natural barefooter.  Everything Caitlynn attempted she accomplished the first time!  Deepwater starts on the boom, shortline, and then longline.  Every time it was perfect and smooth.  Check her out on her first time behind the boat.  Three point to a great stand up!  

Front Deepwater Start

Barefooting Longline

 

Abby’s dad had his work cut out for him and learned a lot in one day!

 

Getting ready to stand up and Barefoot

Barefooting Longline

Abby learned how to barefoot water ski behind the boat in one day. 

Footing Longline

Barefooting behind the boat! Wooo Hoo!

 By Keith St. Onge and Lauren Lindeman