Dryland Practice in Barefooting

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Every barefoot waterskier who lives up north knows that they must take advantage of the few summer months that we have. We will do whatever it takes to ski as much as we can; some try to ski every day. Even though most people know I am not a morning person, I will wake up as early as I can so that I can glide across that glassy water. If it is raining, I usually practice back slalom. Unfortunately, wind is a barefooters nightmare. On most lakes you can find a small stretch to ski on no matter what direction the wind is blowing or some people will trailer their boats to a nearby lake. Most skiers try their best to take advantage of every chance that they have to go skiing.

Almost every barefooter would love to ski all year long, but not everyone has that opportunity. Those of us who live in a cold climate count down the days until the lake is thawed out. While we are counting down, we have to continue to stay motivated. It may be snowing outside but every skier must continue to make goals. We must stay in shape during the off-season and be ready to start skiing. The best way to stay in ski shape is to do dryland practice.

Some people hear the word dryland and they brush it away like it’s nothing. However, dryland is one of the most important aspects of barefoot waterskiing. Muscle memory is a key component to being able to do a trick. If you are unable to do a trick on land, then you will not be able to do it on the water. Dryland helps build up the skier’s confidence and allows them to accomplish all their goals. I do dryland every night right before I go to bed. I hook my US Gear handle up to my bed post and do all the tricks that are on my list of goals. When I am ready to take it to the water I just imagine that I am in my room on the land. After all, according to my coach, Swampy, whether you’re on the water or on the land it doesn’t matter because nothing changes.

By: Kailey Kohler

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